Rochelle Bryan pledges to remain at Barbican

first_imgAfter representing three clubs in 15 years in the nation’s Women’s League football, Rochelle ‘Chunky’ Bryan has fallen in love with Barbican FC. She now has no intention of parting ways with the St Andrew-based club.In her second season at Barbican, Bryan was awarded the Most Valuable Player (MVP) for the just concluded 2015 season. She won the MVP trophy and $25,000 cash incentive at the recent Sherwin- Williams/JFF awards ceremony.Bryan missed the function due to illness, but was naturally happy on hearing the good news. She was a key member of the team which won the league and knockout double. Playing in an attacking midfield role, Bryan netted seven times, including two hat-tricks.”I felt really great when I heard the news as it was my first MVP award in the league after so many years,” Bryan told The Gleaner.”Well, I have been playing in the league since 2000 and won back-to-back titles with my first club, Portmore Strikers, in 2000-01. And, this year I won my fourth title with Barbican,” she disclosed.”It is really a very nice feeling to win such an award. I just gave it my all and it paid dividends,” the 28 year-old former youth and national senior representative stated.She said Barbican are a great club and it is wonderful to be working with her teammates and coach Charles Edwards.”The coach and captain (Philisha Lewis) have been very good to me. They help to motivate the team on a whole. Barbican are like a family and we are reaping the benefits of hard work over the years,” Bryan, who also played at UWI FC two years ago, said.”I intend to remain at Barbican as long as I am healthy and can give my all to the team. The key at Barbican is discipline and the training is very hard. But we are going for it again as we have not lost a game since 2011,” she said.Bryan, who started in the local club league at age 13, has been affected by knee and back injuries during her career.She last played for Jamaica women’s senior team last year, but was not included recently. However, Bryan says whenever she is called, “I am always ready to represent my country.”Right now, we need a lot more help in order to develop the football here. The JFF also needs to do a lot more for women’s football. There is a lot of talent out there, but they need proper guidance,” the veteran footballer shared.last_img read more

#JaVotes2016: First time voter rejects mother’s pressure

first_imgShamoy Reid voted in a general election for the first time today, but indicated that she had to withstand some pressure from her mother to do so. “Me mother a argue wid me because she a tell me who fi vote fah and me tell her she can’t tell me who fi vote fah,” the 21-year-old told The Gleaner after casting her ballot at the Gordon Town Community Centre in the St Andrew East Rural constituency. So how did she arrive at her decision? “One party inna power fi five years, so me just look pan dat and see who me waan vote fah,” she reasoned. The Jamaica Labour Party’s Juliet Holness is challenging the People’s National Party’s Imani Duncan-Price to become the parliamentary representative for the constituency. Reid acknowledged that she has not been paying keen attention to the election campaign, but said she was determined to exercise her right to vote. “If me never vote me wouldn’t have no talk. So if the country nah run right me can’t seh nutten cause me never vote. So if me vote now, me have a talk and me can say sup’n,” she explained. “Persons who no vote, dem nuh have no say enuh cause dem never go vote,” she added. ST ANDREW EAST RURAL CANDIDATES JLP: Juliet Holness PNP: Imani Duncan-Pricelast_img read more

Oral Tracey: Protect Taylor from ‘burn out’

first_imgBoys and Girls’ Champs 2016 is now done and dusted. Once again, it showcased brilliance as Jamaica continues to lead the world in the systemic production of young track-and-field talent. With two early individual records in the 200 and the 400 metres, along with an overall four gold medals, Christopher Taylor of Calabar High was undoubtedly the most dominant athlete on show. The precocious 16-year-old talent must be looked at beyond the scope of setting Champs records and lifting the Mortimer Geddes Trophy for Calabar. Taylor’s supreme talent is a rare gift to be nurtured and showcased by Jamaica for the wider world. Many observers, myself included, are seriously concerned for the future of Taylor in term of realising his potential as a genuine world beater. The World Youth champion over 400 metres is in his fourth year at Calabar High, where he has been nothing but a fearless and aggressive competitor and a champion. He competed in 10 races at Champs 2016 and was flat out in at least eight of those runs. Outside of the physical rigours of doing so much work at such a young age with such a frail physical structure, the possibility of physical, mental, and psychological burnout of this young gem is a clear and present danger. In terms of making the successful transition to the senior level, it is a potentially lethal combination to be as talented as Taylor at such and early age and to attend a Champs-chasing school like Calabar. Rising to the pinnacle of personal performances and team achievements, 14- and 15-year-old provides for a lofty emotional ride for any young athlete. The satisfaction of excelling repeatedly at Champs from such a very early age could be debilitating for the development and transition process of a special young athlete like Taylor. The story has been told of a former Champs star who instructively also attended Calabar and was competing at a World Junior Championships. When he was approached by his national coach with words of motivation and encouragement before the start of his event, the youngster’s response was: “Coach, it’s not Champs, but I will try my best.” The scary history is there for all to see. None of our current senior international male world beaters were outstanding Champs stars at Class Three and represented Champs-winning teams. The athletes who make the transition are generally not from the top Champs schools and generally were not Class Three standouts. Usain Bolt never won at Class Three and competed for William Knibb; Asafa Powell never won at Champs, he went to Charlemont High; Yohan Blake was a big star at Champs for St Jago, but not at Class Three. As great as Taylor is as an athlete, and as a ruthless as he is as a competitor, he is still human and it would a be a tragedy of immense proportion if this youngster – who is already the best in the entire world at his age group – does not make the successful transition to the senior ranks. He is the most special athlete to emerge from the Jamaican production line since Bolt and while the dynamics are different, we must remember that there were moments along the way when we almost lost Bolt. Just as was done for Bolt, Taylor should be protected from ‘burn out”. One more year in school maximum to facilitate the completion of his physical development, then the deliberate and meticulous process should begin of moulding Taylor into the international star he is destined to be.last_img read more

Thompson foresees ‘bright future’ for Reggae Boyz

first_imgRYAN THOMPSON foresees a ‘bright future’ for the Reggae Boyz following recent performances at the CONCACAF Gold Cup. The Jamaicans made history by becoming the first Caribbean team to play in the final and registered another landmark on their way there, when they defeated the United States in the semi-final. Prior to the 2-1 win at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, no Jamaican football team had ever beaten the United States in America. In the final, the team lost 3-1 against Mexico. However, Thompson focused on the positives. “It’s just a building process for the future. It’s very bright for Jamaica’s football,” he said. On the way to the final, the Boyz won their group with seven of maximum nine points, then beat Haiti 1-0 in the quarter-final before advancing to the US game, then the final. After that defeat, their only one at the tournament, he said: “We’re happy with our performance and that’s all we can ask for. Everyone went out there, played to the best of their abilities. Everyone went out there and pretty much wore their hearts on their sleeves out there. We could not have asked for anything more than that.” The tournament itself represented a breakthrough for Thompson, who made the most of half a chance. The 30-year-old goalkeeper grasped the number-one position after starting out as third string. The former Ardenne High School Manning Cup representative got his chance in Jamaica’s last group game against El Salvador in Canada, when Dwayne Miller got injured early and his back-up, AndrÈ Blake, was short on match practice. “It started from last year when I got invited to camp, and ever since, Sch‰fer (Winfried) rang me, I’m there. I made certain that I’m going to be a face that he never forgets. I work hard every single day, I compete every single day. I haven’t missed a camp. I haven’t missed a single trip ever since coach Sch‰fer invited me and I’m thankful for that,” Thompson remarked. “He saw something in me as a player and I know I have a lot to give to the team and I want to build on these things going forward. Hopefully, Jamaica, and not just Jamaica, but the world, will recognise that we have quality players out there and give us the respect that we truly deserve. “I’m just happy with my performance and what I was able to do for my country. Every game, I went out there I gave of my best. I wore my heart on my sleeve out there,” he continued. The goalie made a blunder that caused the goal in the US match and central defender Michael Hector made two that led to goals in the final. However, Thompson said the team’s reaction to such situations reflects a spirit among the group that fosters growth. “It’s amazing. Everybody’s going to make mistakes. This is the beauty about this team, we don’t single out anybody, when one person makes a mistake, everybody makes a mistake, and it’s just amazing to be a part of a group like this, nobody is going to single you out and this is just positive going forward. It’s just pure positives going forward and again, I’m sure Jamaica’s football is going to be very, very bright,” Thompson emphasised. “It’s all a part of the game. You’re gonna make mistakes and stuff happens,” he added. “But I’m proud of my team. I’m proud of everybody. Nobody expected us to be here and we played in the final against Mexico, one of the best teams in the world.”last_img read more

Jamaica face Panama next month

first_imgThe Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) will charge the same monies for tickets for the upcoming CONCACAF FIFA World Cup Qualifying game against Panama on Friday, November 13, at the National Stadium, starting at 9 p.m.In the previous round against Nicaragua, the JFF had charged $6,500 for grandstand category one, $5,500 for grandstand category two and $1,200 for the bleachers section.After the opening game in Round Four of the qualifiers for the 2018 World Cup in Russia, the Reggae Boyz are scheduled to play Haiti next, away on November 17; then Costa Rica on March 25, 2016, at home; again against Costa Rica away four days later; Panama away on September 2, 2016; and then host Haiti on September 6, 2016.After the completion of the round, the top-two teams will advance to the final round, set to run from November 11, 2016 to October 10, 2017.Six teams will play in the final round, and after a home-and-away series, the top-three countries will qualify for the World Cup, while the fourth-place team will beinvolved in a play-off for another spot.Reggae Boyz head coach Winfried Sch‰fer will miss the first two games in Round Four because of a suspension handed down by FIFA’s disciplinary committee.That means the German coach will not be allowed on the sidelines in the games next month. He was also ordered to pay a fine of US$5,150 for a charge of unsporting behaviour against a match official in the previous round against Nicaragua on September 8.Lance Laing and Upston Edwards were banned for four games apiece. The players were charged for using offensive language and gestures against a match official in the same encounter. Both players were also ordered to pay US$5,150 apiece.last_img read more

UWI hold MBU in lacklustre draw

first_img Williams had little service on which to mount a serious attack, as for once, the MBU midfield failed to spark, except on occasions when Donovan Carey, who once again had a good enough day on the right flank. His work rate and quality on the ball, coupled with Williams’ darting runs, could have worked magic for MBU had there been enough forward possession, but UWI were content in letting them control the flow of the game in the first stanza. Little changed in the second half but the visitors showed more grit in midfield and had a few opportunities themselves to strike at goal. The point gives them 13 points but they remain in the relegation battle, something their assistant coach Andrew Peart insists had to change. “It is our desire to remain in the league, so while a point away from home is good in the circumstances, I believe we need to start winning our games to escape relegation,” Peart said. “We got a few chances today and so we can always build on those. I am pleased with our overall performance and accept a point today,” he added. Western Bureau: Montego Bay United (MBU) lost their front-running status in the Red Stripe Premier League, as they were held to a goalless draw by lowly UWI at Westpow Park to slip to second in the standings behind Portmore United. Portmore are in front of the field on 27 points, two more than MBU, who were seeking a return to winning ways, following their failure to win away last week. In a rather lethargic match, it was the visiting UWI team that looked more settled although neither side was able to make a mark in the match. “I am not happy with how we played but I am happy for the fact that we did not lose the match. A point is always better than none, so I will take that,” said MBU assistant coach Loxley Reid. Top striker Dino Williams had an off-day. His best chance coming in the second half, when he flashed a shot at goal but saw it blocked by a defender. NO SPARK IN MIDFIELDlast_img read more

New track boost for Calabar High

first_imgBesides hosting the inaugural staging of the McKenley/Wint Track and Field Classic on Saturday, January 23, the newly laid track at Calabar High School is already reaping huge benefits for the Red Hills Road-based institution. Principal of Calabar, Albert Corcho, revealed yesterday that the school stands to save hundreds of thousands of dollars in transportation costs alone. “We are benefiting already because we usually go to the stadium to train. Once the track is officially handed over we cut out all of that,” he said, following the launch of the track meet at the headquarters of the Jamaica Baptist Union on Washington Boulevard yesterday. “We had to rent buses every day to take the young men to the stadium and back,” he added. He estimated that it costs the school about $15,000 a day for transportation, money that can now be diverted to other areas of the school’s sports development. “Some of that money will go back into the programme; some of it will go elsewhere. It’s a complex we are developing, so in the middle, there is a football field and we are looking at basketball because we want to ensure that we are putting up a sporting complex that will benefit the young men,” the principal said. Lights are also to be installed at the facility. At the launch attended by Sports Minister Natalie Neita Headley, Jamaica Administrative Athletics Association General Secretary Garth Gayle and Calabar alumnus attorney Michael Eaton, it was announced that the track will be handed over during a dedication ceremony set for Friday, January 22. The inaugural meet will serve as an incentive for 400- and 800-metre runners striving to replicate the impact made by Messrs Arthur Wint and Herb McKenley, former Calabar High School athletes described by Minister Neita-Headley as “two great stalwarts of modern Jamaica on whose shoulders we now stand”. At the 1948 Olympic Games in London, Wint won Jamaica’s first ever Olympic gold medal in the 400m; McKenley the silver. In Helsinki, Finland in 1952 both men were members of Jamaica’s mile relay team, along with George Rhoden and Les Laing, which broke the world record in winning gold. As such, the overall fastest times in the boys and girls 400 metres will be given the Arthur Wint Trophies donated by the Wint family while the top performers in the men’s and women’s Olympic Development 400m and 800m will be awarded cash prizes donated by members of the McKenley family and the Calabar Old Boys’ Association New York Chapter. ENTIRE SPORTS COMPLEXlast_img read more

#JaVotes2016: PNP supporters injured in car crash

first_img One eyewitness, who refused to be named, said the motor vehicle passed up the road before and returned before swinging at a group of persons. “One of them, the man in the back get a serious injury. Them look bad and just look like them come on the road to show them bad. Him did a drive and smoke weed and look like him can’t drive,” she stated. “Officer, a want you put in your report that Portia bus crash,” one man clad in full green shouted to police which had gathered on the scene. The men have since been taken to the Kingston Public Hospital, where Sergeant Miller of the Motorised Patrol Unit said: “One of the injured men was admitted to the operating theatre, one suffered injury to his mouth and the most serious injury to his neck.” The driver wasn’t hurt and the injuries are not life threatening, but a female Inspector of Police for the Kingston Central Police division is imploring caution on the road. “I implore drivers to just adhere to the rules of the road,” she stressed. High Political drama unfolded early this morning in the vicinity of the old JAMINTEL Building on Duke Street in downtown Kingston, where Jamaica Labour Party supporters claim a motor vehicle full of Peoples National Party supporters “swung at them and crashed.” The four men were driving a brown Honda Odyssey van registered with a public passenger licence plate.last_img read more

Foster’s Fairplay: Reward Cuthbert-Flynn

first_imgOlivia ‘Babsy’ Grange has returned to the country’s new ministerial Cabinet in a familiar role. Sports will again have the benefit of her long-time exposure in that arena. Her first visible move is praiseworthy. She paid a touching tribute to Jordan Foote, the footballer out of Holy Trinity High School, who sadly succumbed to the ravages of cancer, during which he had lost a leg. On his bereaved family’s behalf, Foster’s Fairplay says “Thank you, Minister.” On a brighter note, Champs is in the air. With its coming, there is the usual friendly, if at times raucous, crosstalk between supporters of the rival schools. Traditionally, the heat is a lot more intense with the face-offs within the boys’ arena. Social media continues to be fertile soil for the raves and rants. Predictions are the domain of others a lot more qualified to engage in that activity, now fine-tuned to a science. The usual clamour, including calls for transparency, surrounds the distribution of entry tickets. The five-day event continues to attract an audience which severely outstrips the capacity of the hosting facility. At some point, the powers that be shall be asked to give full account. With the new Government’s initial slate of executive positions released, Foster’s Fairplay notes with disappointment (no pun intended) and dismay a glaring omission. No place has been found in her area of excellence for Member of Parliament Juliet Cuthbert-Flynn. She is the second sporting personality of her calibre to venture into the oven of politics. World icon, the late Herb McKenley, preceded her in the tenuous move and was twice roasted. Cuthbert-Flynn, the 1992 Barcelona Olympics double sprint silver medallist, has shown admirable courage and commitment (gender restrictions bar the word ‘cojones’) in her consummate contribution to her country. Follow this journalist to the 1995 IAAF World Championships in Gothenburg. After completing her individual sprint duties, the 100m finalist took ill and was hospitalised. In her mind, the supporting trio of Dahlia Duhaney, Beverly McDonald and Merlene Ottey needed her usual inspirational backstretch run to buttress their chances for gold in the sprint relay. The St Thomas lass, her thoughts locked on a repeat gold, as achieved by the same quartet four years prior at the Tokyo World Champs, did what was to her the only thing. She went from sickbed to track and a silver medal was forged in that crucible of sheer grit and determination, to make it Jamaica. This spoke to a rare quality of resilience and resolve to bounce back from adversity. In Barcelona, her personal catalogue could have shown gold in the 4x100m relay. With Michelle Freeman on lead off, plus the other two girls from the Tokyo triumph, barring relay trauma, top spot looked good. Her second-leg straightaway flasher was stopped short with a hamstring injury that severely compromised the second handover. Jamaica were out. The nation was rocked and moved to tears. The pain was intensified the following year with the Stuttgart World Championships. Recovery was slow and the void was filled with signs pointing her to the exit door from the sport. They sprang from the least expected of sources, some ideally positioned to enforce such a white flag hoisting. She, however, survived and Gothenburg was as recounted. Her final hurrah, at her own pace, was the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. She bade farewell with sprint relay bronze, assisted by Freeman, a near-lame Nikole Mitchell and the perennial Ottey. What a Juliet! What a warrior! What a Jamaican! She has stared down the barrel of guns held by thieving thugs. Only mention of her name saved her from a sad story. Now, at age 51, with the challenges of pregnancy, countering Zika virus precautions, she whips an incumbent who was super confident of almost automatic victory. Where is the recognition? Where is the reward? Consulted on her omission, she responded tersely: “Sorry … I do not have any comment on that matter.” For feedback, email lauriefoster2012@gmail.comlast_img read more

Questions abound as Test ends in farce

first_img UNEXPECTED EVENT PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC): There were more questions than answers left hanging after the fourth and final Test between West Indies and India finished in a farcical draw on the final day yesterday. For the fourth straight day, play was abandoned without a ball bowled because of a wet outfield at Queen’s Park Oval, despite an abundance of sunshine at the ground in recent days. Umpires made the call around 9:30 a.m. when it was became apparent, following an early inspection of the ground, that the outfield would not be fit for play. Rain halted play just before lunch on last Thursday’s opening day and the action never resumed, raising huge questions about the historic ground’s drainage system and mopping up operations. West Indies head coach Phil Simmons, a Trinidadian, said he had been surprised by the inability of the outfield to recover. “(I am) extremely surprised. As far as I know in my years here, this has never been a ground like that,” he told reporters here yesterday after the game was called off. “I don’t know what is the position over on the other side, but after two days of sun, when I saw it (outfield) yesterday morning, I couldn’t believe how bad it was. “I don’t know what the position is and what caused that, but I’m surprised because I never expected that here.” All told, only 13/4 hours’ play was possible in the game – in the morning session of the opening day – before rain forced the abandonment of the last two sessions. West Indies had reached 62 for two after winning the toss and choosing to bat first, with opener Kraigg Brathwaite unbeaten on 34 and partnered by Marlon Samuels on four. The two batsmen to fall were opener Leon Johnson for nine and fellow left-hander Darren Bravo, who made 10. On Sunday, play was abandoned at 10:25 a.m. and umpires had ruled out any possibility of play on Saturday’s third day at midday. Several inspections were made on the second day before play was abandoned at 2:25 p.m. India captain Virat Kohli said what transpired over the last few days had been beyond his side’s control. “Here, we didn’t have a game and we couldn’t control the result. The other two games we played, we won convincingly and that pleased the whole squad,” Kohli said. West Indies lost the opening Test in Antigua by an innings and 92 runs, drew the second in Jamaica before slumping to a 237-run defeat in the third Test in St Lucia. All-rounder Ravi Ashwin was voted Man of the Series for his two centuries at an average of 57 and 17 wickets.last_img read more