Rochelle Bryan pledges to remain at Barbican

first_imgAfter representing three clubs in 15 years in the nation’s Women’s League football, Rochelle ‘Chunky’ Bryan has fallen in love with Barbican FC. She now has no intention of parting ways with the St Andrew-based club.In her second season at Barbican, Bryan was awarded the Most Valuable Player (MVP) for the just concluded 2015 season. She won the MVP trophy and $25,000 cash incentive at the recent Sherwin- Williams/JFF awards ceremony.Bryan missed the function due to illness, but was naturally happy on hearing the good news. She was a key member of the team which won the league and knockout double. Playing in an attacking midfield role, Bryan netted seven times, including two hat-tricks.”I felt really great when I heard the news as it was my first MVP award in the league after so many years,” Bryan told The Gleaner.”Well, I have been playing in the league since 2000 and won back-to-back titles with my first club, Portmore Strikers, in 2000-01. And, this year I won my fourth title with Barbican,” she disclosed.”It is really a very nice feeling to win such an award. I just gave it my all and it paid dividends,” the 28 year-old former youth and national senior representative stated.She said Barbican are a great club and it is wonderful to be working with her teammates and coach Charles Edwards.”The coach and captain (Philisha Lewis) have been very good to me. They help to motivate the team on a whole. Barbican are like a family and we are reaping the benefits of hard work over the years,” Bryan, who also played at UWI FC two years ago, said.”I intend to remain at Barbican as long as I am healthy and can give my all to the team. The key at Barbican is discipline and the training is very hard. But we are going for it again as we have not lost a game since 2011,” she said.Bryan, who started in the local club league at age 13, has been affected by knee and back injuries during her career.She last played for Jamaica women’s senior team last year, but was not included recently. However, Bryan says whenever she is called, “I am always ready to represent my country.”Right now, we need a lot more help in order to develop the football here. The JFF also needs to do a lot more for women’s football. There is a lot of talent out there, but they need proper guidance,” the veteran footballer shared.last_img read more

#JaVotes2016: First time voter rejects mother’s pressure

first_imgShamoy Reid voted in a general election for the first time today, but indicated that she had to withstand some pressure from her mother to do so. “Me mother a argue wid me because she a tell me who fi vote fah and me tell her she can’t tell me who fi vote fah,” the 21-year-old told The Gleaner after casting her ballot at the Gordon Town Community Centre in the St Andrew East Rural constituency. So how did she arrive at her decision? “One party inna power fi five years, so me just look pan dat and see who me waan vote fah,” she reasoned. The Jamaica Labour Party’s Juliet Holness is challenging the People’s National Party’s Imani Duncan-Price to become the parliamentary representative for the constituency. Reid acknowledged that she has not been paying keen attention to the election campaign, but said she was determined to exercise her right to vote. “If me never vote me wouldn’t have no talk. So if the country nah run right me can’t seh nutten cause me never vote. So if me vote now, me have a talk and me can say sup’n,” she explained. “Persons who no vote, dem nuh have no say enuh cause dem never go vote,” she added. ST ANDREW EAST RURAL CANDIDATES JLP: Juliet Holness PNP: Imani Duncan-Pricelast_img read more

Oral Tracey: Protect Taylor from ‘burn out’

first_imgBoys and Girls’ Champs 2016 is now done and dusted. Once again, it showcased brilliance as Jamaica continues to lead the world in the systemic production of young track-and-field talent. With two early individual records in the 200 and the 400 metres, along with an overall four gold medals, Christopher Taylor of Calabar High was undoubtedly the most dominant athlete on show. The precocious 16-year-old talent must be looked at beyond the scope of setting Champs records and lifting the Mortimer Geddes Trophy for Calabar. Taylor’s supreme talent is a rare gift to be nurtured and showcased by Jamaica for the wider world. Many observers, myself included, are seriously concerned for the future of Taylor in term of realising his potential as a genuine world beater. The World Youth champion over 400 metres is in his fourth year at Calabar High, where he has been nothing but a fearless and aggressive competitor and a champion. He competed in 10 races at Champs 2016 and was flat out in at least eight of those runs. Outside of the physical rigours of doing so much work at such a young age with such a frail physical structure, the possibility of physical, mental, and psychological burnout of this young gem is a clear and present danger. In terms of making the successful transition to the senior level, it is a potentially lethal combination to be as talented as Taylor at such and early age and to attend a Champs-chasing school like Calabar. Rising to the pinnacle of personal performances and team achievements, 14- and 15-year-old provides for a lofty emotional ride for any young athlete. The satisfaction of excelling repeatedly at Champs from such a very early age could be debilitating for the development and transition process of a special young athlete like Taylor. The story has been told of a former Champs star who instructively also attended Calabar and was competing at a World Junior Championships. When he was approached by his national coach with words of motivation and encouragement before the start of his event, the youngster’s response was: “Coach, it’s not Champs, but I will try my best.” The scary history is there for all to see. None of our current senior international male world beaters were outstanding Champs stars at Class Three and represented Champs-winning teams. The athletes who make the transition are generally not from the top Champs schools and generally were not Class Three standouts. Usain Bolt never won at Class Three and competed for William Knibb; Asafa Powell never won at Champs, he went to Charlemont High; Yohan Blake was a big star at Champs for St Jago, but not at Class Three. As great as Taylor is as an athlete, and as a ruthless as he is as a competitor, he is still human and it would a be a tragedy of immense proportion if this youngster – who is already the best in the entire world at his age group – does not make the successful transition to the senior ranks. He is the most special athlete to emerge from the Jamaican production line since Bolt and while the dynamics are different, we must remember that there were moments along the way when we almost lost Bolt. Just as was done for Bolt, Taylor should be protected from ‘burn out”. One more year in school maximum to facilitate the completion of his physical development, then the deliberate and meticulous process should begin of moulding Taylor into the international star he is destined to be.last_img read more