Tripoli (LHA 7) passes acceptance trials

first_img View post tag: HII Photo: Tripoli (LHA 7) during builder’s sea trials. Photo: Derek Fountain/Huntington Ingalls Industries View post tag: US Navy The US Navy’s newest America-class amphibious assault ship, future USS Tripoli (LHA 7), has completed acceptance trials.The aviation-centric ship spent three days underway in the Gulf of Mexico during the trials, before returning to the Ingalls Shipbuilding’s shipyard.The Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey evaluated all of the ship’s major systems including propulsion, communications, navigation, combat systems and aviation capabilities.“The capability that our large deck amphibs bring to the fight is tremendous,” said Tom Rivers, amphibious warfare program manager for Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. “Their ability to embark F-35 B Joint Strike Fighters and MV-22 Osprey enable this versatile platform to increase the lethality of our expeditionary warfighters.”Tripoli is the second ship of the America (LHA 6) class, built to facilitate forward presence and power projection. LHA 7 is the last Flight 0 ship planned for construction and features an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the aviation maintenance facilities, an increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity.LHA 8 will be the first Flight I ship, reincorporating a well deck to enhance expeditionary warfighting capabilities while maintaining the principal aviation characteristics of the Flight 0 ships.“There’s been a lot of hard work accomplished to get LHA 7 to this point”, said Capt. Nathan Schneider, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair Gulf Coast. “The team’s focus is now on delivering the LHA 7 to the fleet in the best possible condition, fully capable and ready to deploy if called upon.”LHA 7 incorporates gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution, and fuel-efficient electric auxiliary propulsion systems first installed on USS Makin Island (LHD 8). LHA 7 is 844 feet in length, has a displacement of approximately 45,000 long tons and is capable of operating at speeds of over 20 knots.Once it enters service in the summer of 2020, future USS Tripoli will be capable of operating F-35B jets, like sister ship USS America in this US Navy photo View post tag: America-class View post tag: USS Tripoli Share this articlelast_img read more

Admissions 2020: How has each college responded?

first_imgSomerville College has confirmed it would honour all offers should students successfully appeal results. Principal Janet Royall tweeted on Friday that Somerville will exercise clemency only to students who are “under-represented”, without detailing what students would fall under this category. Following pressure on the University to admit offer-holders who missed their grades, a majority of undergraduate colleges have released statements on their admissions policies this year. This article will be updated as colleges release and revise statements. A list of updates, in the order in which they were made as new information became available, can be found at the bottom of the page. University College updated its statement after the UK government’s U-turn on A-level decisions on Monday evening: “In light of today’s announcement that A Level grades are to be awarded on the basis of teacher predictions, Univ will now confirm the places of all its UK offer-holders.” In case an offer-holder’s course is over-subscribed, the college will confirm their place for 2021. St. Hugh’s College confirmed on Monday that it will admit all UK offer-holders. In a statement, the college said: “It is our belief that this year’s formal gradings do not provide any additional evidence of these candidates’ abilities. We have therefore concluded it would only be right in the circumstances we face this year to trust the assessments our tutors made in offering places to these candidates”. A “small number” of offer-holders whose courses are now full will be offered guaranteed entry in 2021. In the face of a renewed call from the Oxford SU for the university to honour all offers given to UK A-Level students following the government reversal on Monday afternoon, individual colleges continue to differ substantially in their responses: Jesus College also announced it will admit all UK offer-holders, after previously confirming places for 70% of applicants with “mitigating circumstances” and admitting all Opportunity Oxford offer-holders. All 2020 offer-holders will now have their places confirmed for either this year or next year. Lady Margaret Hall has “confirmed places at LMH for 97 per cent of all 2020 offer holders.” This includes the highest percentage (93%) of candidates who have missed their grades across all colleges. LMH confirmed that it has “more than doubled [its] rate of ‘clemency’ this year for candidates who were ‘near misses’ – including those affected by algorithmic adjustment.” Guaranteed entry for near-misses or access programme offer-holders St. Anne’s College has already given clemency to 70% of offer-holders who were not awarded their necessary grades. The college has also confirmed that it would “confirm their [offer-holders’] place for 2021 entry” if they are assigned the necessary grades as a result of an appeal.   Wadham College and St Edmund Hall followed Worcester’s decision on Sunday and will also admit all UK offer holders. For capacity reasons, some students will be guaranteed deferred entry for 2021. Mansfield College has “admitted a record number of students, […] by going almost 10% above [its] planned maximum number for this year.” Mansfield’s Principal Helen Mountfield QC further stated: “We have offered places to all our candidates who met their offers and extended ‘clemency’ to as many students as possible who missed them, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds.” This year, Mansfield College continues being the Oxford undergraduate college with the highest state school representation (91%).  A “majority” of missed offers accepted   St. John’s College shared: “Most St John’s offer-holders in fact met their conditions despite the extraordinary circumstances. For those that did not, the St John’s admissions team has reviewed each case in great detail, taking into account all the other performance measures available to us.”  Magdalen College has given places to “the majority of offer-holders who did not satisfy the conditions of their offer.” A statement reads: “We are watching the evolving situation closely, and we will be following the University’s policy in considering any appeals that we receive.”  The University has stated that “over half of students who missed their offers have now been admitted” and confirmed that “[they] have been more lenient with students from UK state schools who missed their offer.” A statement from the Wadham Warden Ken Macdonald QC reads: “It has become increasingly clear to the College that this year’s formal gradings are not adding to our knowledge of applicants’ ability to the extent that we could safely conclude that some of those previously selected for offers should now be denied their places.” Pembroke College has admitted all candidates who missed their offer by one grade. A college statement confirmed that one-fifth of Pembroke’s 2020 intake will be candidates who missed their grades. In 2020, Pembroke will see a record 70% of its UK student intake coming from state schools with “one third coming from the most disadvantaged groups.” Balliol College has now, according to an updated statement on its website, “confirmed offers to its largest ever undergraduate cohort, including to all offer-holders from a state school or a disadvantaged background”. 12% of Balliol’s intake for 2020 will be students admitted “as a result of flexibility shown by the College” and its incoming group of Freshers will be 72% state-educated. St. Catherine’s College stated: “At St Catherine’s, we have already exceeded our target intake for 2020 entry, but we are currently exploring the possibility of other options in response to the complex and rapidly changing situation. If an alternative solution cannot be found, any candidates who meet the conditions of their offer through the appeal process, will be guaranteed a place for entry in 2021.”   No information on admissions statistics in statement  The College said: “Many members of our college community and beyond have expressed their concern for the potential impact of yesterday’s A Level results on this year’s incoming students. At Worcester we made offers in 2020 to our most diverse cohort ever, and in response to the uncertainties surrounding this year’s assessment, we have confirmed the places of all our UK offer-holders, irrespective of their A-level results.” Lewis Goodall, BBC Policy Editor and St. John’s alumnus, wrote on Twitter: “In a letter to Alumni, an Oxford college told alumni this [Sunday] morning that they’re worried if they did what Worcester did they’d be admitting students who might ‘not flourish’”. Speaking to Cherwell, Mr. Goodall later confirmed that this college was St. John’s. Trinity College has confirmed places for 100% of its offer-holders from the most disadvantaged backgrounds “as defined by Oxford’s metrics”. The college is also “actively and urgently exploring the options” for offer-holders who have not been awarded the grades they needed. Exeter College initially announced that it would admit nine more students than its number in 2019 (98), having granted clemency to “a record number of students based on their individual circumstances”. On Monday, it, too, confirmed that it would admit all UK offer-holders, taking its total incoming Freshers to 110, although “one additional UK offer-holders’ place is deferred until 2021 because of University-level capacity constraints on their course”.  Worcester College was the first college to announce on Friday that it would accept all UK offer holders, irrespective of their A-level results.  St. Peter’s College announced on Monday that it will confirm places for 100% of offer holders from UK state schools. The remaining students whose offers were not met will have their places confirmed if their grades are revised. Some offer-holders who missed their grades but had their places confirmed will be offered entry in 2021. Has not released information  New College announced on Monday that it will also admit all UK offer holders. On Twitter, the college wrote: “New College can confirm we have concluded the review of our outstanding offers, and is pleased to announce that all undergraduate offers made in 2019/20 have been confirmed.” Admitting all UK offer-holders Expanding intake size and some clemency Christ Church has offered clemency “more than in any other year we have on record” and confirmed that “clemency decisions were possible for 93% of our offer holders who attended state schools”. This year, almost 40% of teachers’ recommended English A-level results were initially downgraded, following the replacement of exams with a standardisation algorithm that used teachers’ assessments and schools’ results history. Analysis has shown that students from state comprehensive schools with large class sizes were hit the hardest by the algorithm. Brasenose College has communicated that “in the great majority of cases, [the college] confirmed places. The reviews took into account interview and test scores plus relevant contextual information.” Brasenose also stated that it admitted some students from other colleges “to help them maximise the number of possible reprieves across the University.” Brasenose’s intake this year is 9% above normal and will consist of 79% state school students. Merton College announced on Monday that it has admitted “virtually all of those students whose results were not as they had hoped”, although there are no exact numbers given. The college has, however, confirmed that the incoming freshers will have its highest ever proportion of state-educated students, at 70%. This article was updated on 17/08/2020, 10:13 am to include a statement by New College, on 17/08/2020, 12:16 pm to include a revised statement by Jesus College, on 17/08/2020, 12:57 pm to include a statement by St. Peter’s College, on 17/08/2020, 1:46 pm to include a statement by Trinity College, on 17/08/2020, 2:26 pm to include a revised statement by Exeter College, on 17/08/2020, 3:58 pm to include a statement by Merton College, on 17/08/2020, 4:37 pm to include a revised statement by Balliol College, on 17/08/2020, 5:15 pm to include a statement by St. Hugh’s College, on 17/08/2020, 5:55 pm to include a revised statement by Keble College and on 17/08/2020, 21:27 pm to include a statement by Queen’s College as well as an updated statement by University College and an updated statement from Hertford College Hertford College has confirmed it would “accept the majority of our offer-holders who did not receive grades which fulfilled their original offer conditions”. Furthermore, the college stated it would be admitting its “largest ever cohort with 81% of UK students from state schools.” On Monday evening, the college updated its statement to confirm the places of any outstanding offer-holders who will meet their offer conditions with the grades recommended by their teachers. Queen’s College also updated its statement on Monday evening to confirm it will admit all those who hold conditional offers. The college stated that it had “become aware of, and welcome[d], the government’s decision to abandon its standardisation model.” Keble College updated its statement on Monday evening and will honour all offers made this year irrespective of students’ A-level results. Where University departments are at full capacity, Keble will defer offer-holders’ places until 2021. A petition by a Keble College offer-holder who missed her place by one grade, calling on the University to accept all state school “near misses” has collected over 6,000 signatures at the time of writing. St. Hilda’s College said in a statement: “Our Fellows, Senior Tutor and the Academic Office team are working extremely hard with our offer holders who have met their conditions, and with those who have not. We are very sensitive to the current situation, especially in how it may have affected applicants from disadvantaged backgrounds.”  Corpus Christi College, Lincoln College, Oriel College and Regent’s Park College are yet to release statements.   Update 18/08/2020: Following the government’s announcement that A-Level results will be based on teacher’s Centre Assessed Grades, the University has announced it will honour the offers of all candidates whose CAG meets their conditional offer (excluding courses with externally determined caps). The statements and policies listed below are college-specific and were last updated before the University’s announcement. last_img read more

Professorship in vaccinology secured by £3 million Saïd donation

first_imgOxford says the gift will ensure Professor Gilbert can “continue her ground-breaking research in the field, while also helping to ensure that Oxford remains at the forefront of vaccine development for generations to come.” “By securing the future of this important post, the University will be able to continue to deliver and indeed accelerate its world-leading vaccine development research – work that will have an impact on lives globally both during this crisis and as other such challenges arise in the future.” Oxford’s vaccine development team has received a £3.33 million gift from Wafic Saïd. The money will be used to fund the professorship in vaccinology, creating a permanent endowment for the position. The post, currently held by Professor Sarah Gillbert, will be known as the Saïd Professor of Vaccinology. Saïd is a Saudi Arabian financier and philanthropist who is worth £1.5 billion, according to the Times. He is one of Oxford’s biggest donators and donated over £15 million towards a new teaching facility in 2019. The donation was made by the Saïd family, a wealthy Saudi Arabian family and chief benefactor of the Saïd Business School. The University has also given £1.66 million to fund the position. “I hope that the Saïd Professorship of Vaccinology will strengthen in perpetuity the University’s efforts to be a world leader in vaccine research.” Gilbert has been working on Oxford’s COVID-19 vaccine since 11 January and previously led development of the universal flu vaccine which underwent clinical trials in 2011. Due to her work on the COVID vaccine, Bazaar magazine named her one of 2020’s Women of the Year. He added: “I am delighted to support [Gilbert} and the University of Oxford as they work urgently towards developing a vaccine for the COVID-19 virus. This is the single most important thing in the world today as the only way we can return to normality is to have an effective vaccine. Saïd told The Daily Mail: “Professor Gilbert is a great scientist. It is the single most important thing to bring us back to normality – to have this vaccine.” Professor Gavin Screaton, head of the Medical Sciences Division, said: “We are deeply grateful to Wafic Saïd and his family for their incredibly generous gift. In July, Indian steel magnate Lakshmi Mittal donated £3.5 million to fund another professorship in vaccinology. This donation supported the position held by Professor Adrian Hill, Director of the Oxford Jenner Institute.last_img read more

WWII Vet From Ocean City Honored by French Consulate

first_imgConsul General of France Anne-Claire Legendre pins a medal on the shirt of Ocean City resident Francis X. McCormac for his bravery while serving in WWII stationed in France. By MADDY VITALEFrancis X. McCormac is a U.S. Army veteran – and the Ocean City resident is one of a dwindling number of servicemen still alive who fought valiantly in World War II.At 99 years old, McCormac said in an interview Tuesday he still feels pretty good, as he lounged on the deck of his daughter Maureen’s resort home while awaiting the arrival of some important people.Members of the French Consulate were en route to present him with the highest honor – a Chevalier (Knight) of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honor. The award was for McCormac’s service from 1942-45 as a signal corpsman, most notably during the D-Day invasion of Omaha Beach in Normandy.It is an honor given to civilians or military members, created in 1802 by Napoleon to recognize men and women who have accomplished exceptional deeds for France and its people.The honor was bestowed upon McCormac during a ceremony in the backyard of his daughter’s home, as he was surrounded by family and friends.The decorated serviceman, who was a sergeant, spoke a bit about life, but just not of the war.“I don’t talk about it,” McCormac said as he tugged on his patriotic face covering. “I’m just glad I made it – that’s all. I don’t talk about it, but I’m proud that I served my country.”Yet he still thinks about WWII nearly every day of his life, he said.Video courtesy of Kay Jacob’s Facebook page.https://www.facebook.com/francis.mccormac.7/videos/4007586939258001 Among those in attendance at the ceremony were Congressman Jeff Van Drew, Ocean City Mayor Jay Gillian, City Council members, American Legion Post 524 Commander Bob Marzulli, other veterans and members of the French Consulate.McCormac described what the honor means to him.“I am overwhelmed,” he said. “It means a lot to me. I never expected anything like this. I thought it was all gone – it was 75 years ago – but it came up again.”Consul General of France Anne-Claire Legendre pinned the medal onto McCormac’s shirt. He looked down at the pin, then to the crowd, and gave a thumb’s up.In a portion of Legendre’s speech, she said, “Mr. McCormac, you put your life at great risk to help liberate my country and the world from the terrors of Nazism. You were very young, and you probably knew very little about France or Europe.”She continued, “Yet you were prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice, thousands of miles away from your family, your home and your friends.”McCormac entered the service in Massachusetts and was then shipped out to Scotland. From there, he landed on Omaha Beach, followed by deployments to Belgium and Germany, including for the Battle of the Bulge, according to a news release.Mayor Jay Gillian hands veteran Francis X. McCormac a ceremonial key to the city.During the Battle of the Bulge, McCormac’s Northern France radio relay unit informed U.S. Army units of the Nazis ruse of dressing in GI uniforms and posing as Military Police to misdirect Allied troops. Those messages were critical in stopping the Nazi efforts.In 2004, on the 60th anniversary of D-Day, then-French President Jacques Chirac decided to honor all American WWII veterans who had fought on French soil, including McCormac.Other awards were also presented to McCormac during Tuesday’s ceremony. The mayor presented McCormac with a ceremonial key to the city.“Thank you for everything. You humble me,” Gillian said.Marzulli handed McCormac a letter and a special membership card to the American Legion Post 524.Tom Tumelty, a trustee from Post 524, began the process to make the French honor possible. McCormac’s daughter, Maureen, of Ocean City, also helped. She filled out the forms and Tumelty sent them off to be reviewed by the French Consulate.Within weeks, they received notification that the veteran would indeed receive the honor, Tumelty said.U.S. Army Veteran Francis McCormac with Consul General of France Anne-Claire Legendre, at left, and his family.McCormac, a father of seven, grandfather to 11 and great-grandfather to 15, is humble about his service. He married Esther McQuillan and they were together for 70 years before her death in 2016.And if he doesn’t sing his own praises, that is OK.His record of service is indelibly imprinted in history. He received the European African Middle Eastern Service Ribbon, the Good Conduct Medal and the Meritorious Unit Award.After his military service, he went on to have a career as an inspector for a TV and radio company.City Council President Bob Barr summed up during some remarks as he presented a proclamation on behalf of City Council to McCormac. He spoke of what he believed McCormac represented Tuesday and what the nearly centenarian means to society.“You are the embodiment of the American spirit,” Barr said. “You are a true hero. Know that we appreciate you and we love you and thank you for all you have done.”U.S. Army veteran Francis X. McCormac with his proclamation from the French Consulate.last_img read more

Goshen Health ICU at capacity as hospital has record number of COVID-19 patients

first_img Pinterest (Photo supplied/Goshen Health) Goshen Hospital is experiencing a record number of coronavirus patients and a full Intensive Care Unit.Goshen Health said in a statement Monday that the number of COVID-19 patients at Goshen Hospital is at an “all-time high” of 57, with more coming. The hospital had to cancel several surgeries Monday and some scheduled for later in the week due to a shortage of beds.“The situation is critical. The people of our community cannot afford to have our hospital focused completely on the needs of COVID-19 patients at the expense of other necessary procedures and surgeries,” said Dr. Dan Nafziger, Goshen Hospital Chief Medical Officer and Infectious Disease Specialist. “Our intensive care unit beds are full. We have had to send some patients who need intensive care to other facilities – and we may not have this option for long, as they are also filling up. Please review your Thanksgiving plans to reduce everyone’s risk.”Goshen Health is asking everyone to wear a mask when around people not in their household, avoid gatherings, and stay home when sick or exposed to someone with coronavirus. Twitter Google+ Goshen Health ICU at capacity as hospital has record number of COVID-19 patients Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp Facebook Facebook By Jon Zimney – November 23, 2020 0 287 Twitter WhatsApp CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Previous articleAstraZeneca joins Pfizer, Moderna in developing coronavirus vaccineNext articleTwo men arrested on weapons charges after traffic stop, pursuit in South Bend Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

Sharon Jones Suffered A Stroke Watching The Election Results

first_imgMusic fans everywhere were crushed last Friday, November 18th, when beloved soul singer Ms. Sharon Jones passed away at the age of 60. Jones’ story was one of triumph, getting her first big break at the age of 40 and, years later, overcoming cancer and returning to the stage. Unfortunately, though that cancer returned late last year, Jones remained optimistic and still performed occasionally.With the shocking news of Sharon Jones’ death, the Los Angeles Times spoke with her bandmate in the Dap-Kings, Gabriel Roth, to learn more about her final days. Roth explained that Jones suffered a stroke while watching the 2016 Presidential Election, saying “Well, she’d been fighting fighting cancer for a few years now, and there’s been all kinds of stuff coming at her. But the thing that actually got her in the last couple of weeks was, she had a stroke watching the election results. After that first stroke she couldn’t move her leg, but she could still talk.I flew out and met her up in the hospital in Cooperstown, and I saw her and she told the people that were there that Trump gave her the stroke. She was blaming Trump for the whole thing.”Roth continues the story, explaining that on the following day, Jones unfortunately suffered a second stroke that left her unable to speak. However, “that part of her that’s singing, that part of her that made music and that loved music and that was musical just didn’t want to go. It was just so strong.” Even though she couldn’t speak, Jones was still able to hum along with the band. The entire group was at her side when she passed.We’ll miss you, Sharon Jones. Rest in peace.last_img read more

To understand Trump, learn from his voters

first_imgTo make sense of Donald Trump’s emerging presidency, it helps to understand the social and economic discontent that put him in office. Harvard Professor Michael Sandel took a hard look at those concerns during a Tuesday afternoon lecture called “Why Trump? What Now?” Sandel argued that Trump’s rise reflected a populist backlash against “decades of rising inequality and a version of globalization that benefited those at the top but left ordinary people feeling disempowered.”Addressing a full house at Harvard Law School’s Langdell Hall, Sandel first acknowledged the concerns of many of his listeners.“Many people around the world worry that the American republic is tilting toward tyranny,” he said. “Many Americans worry too.”Trump’s presidency, Sandel suggested, is most comparable to Richard Nixon’s because each posed a “stress test” to the constitutional order.  Both referred to the news media as enemies of the American people. “That phrase has a long and dark provenance,” he said. “It’s been used by Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, and Mao — ‘big-league tyrants,’ as Mr. Trump might call them.”Yet it’s a mistake, said Sandel, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government, to see Trump’s win as only the product of bigotry, or even of economic concerns. “Donald Trump tapped into a wellspring of anxieties and legitimate grievances, to which the mainstream parties offered no compelling answers. The upheavals of 2016 were a political response to a political failure of historic proportions.”The roots of that failure, he said, go back to the Clinton years, when Democrats deregulated the financial industry and did little to address growing inequality and the influence of money on politics. And though President Barack Obama “showed that progressive politics can speak a language of moral and spiritual purpose,” Sandel thought that wasn’t reflected in his presidency.“He appointed economic advisers who had promoted financial deregulation in the Clinton years. He bailed out the banks on terms that did not hold them to account and offered little help for ordinary citizens who lost their homes. Lingering anger over the bailout cast a shadow over the Obama presidency and fueled a mood of populist protest across the political spectrum.  On the left, it prompted the Occupy movement and the candidacy of Bernie Sanders. And on the right, it prompted the Tea Party movement and the election of Trump.”Sandel, the author of “Democracy’s Discontent,” argued that progressive parties must rethink their mission and purpose. “They should learn from the populism that has displaced them — not by replicating the xenophobia and strident nationalism, but by taking seriously the legitimate concerns with which these ugly sentiments are entangled.” In particular, he said, there are four themes that need to be addressed: income inequality, meritocratic hubris, the dignity of work, and patriotism and national community.The first two points, he said, are related. Income inequality is now so widespread that the promise of upward mobility is no longer an adequate response. The familiar assurance that those who “work hard and play by the rules will succeed” no longer seems to apply.“This slogan now rings hollow. Americans born to poor families tend to stay poor as adults. Progressives should reconsider the assumption that mobility can compensate for inequality.  They should reckon more directly with inequalities of income and wealth,” said Sandel.This is tied to the problem of “meritocratic hubris,” the sense that winners and losers are both deserving of their status. “The idea that the system rewards talent and hard work encourages the winners to consider their success their own doing, and to look down upon those less fortunate than themselves,” he said. “Those who are not successful may feel that their failure is their own doing. Such attitudes fuel the anger and frustration at the heart of the populist backlash, and Trump’s victory.”This led in turn to his third point, that society now accords less respect to the work that the working class does.“Society has lavished outsize rewards on hedge fund managers, and the esteem accorded work in the traditional sense has become fragile and uncertain,” he said. “New technologies may further erode the dignity of work, rendering many of today’s jobs obsolete. Political parties need to grapple with the meaning of work and its place in a good life.”Finally, he examined the issue of patriotism, specifically the populist fury that immigration and outsourcing have stirred in some.“Workers who believe that their country cares more for cheap goods and cheap labor than the job prospects of its own people feel betrayed,” he said. “This sense of betrayal often finds ugly, intolerant expression: hatred of immigrants, a strident nationalism that vilifies ‘outsiders,’ and the rhetoric of ‘taking back our country.’ Liberals rightly condemn the hateful rhetoric, but fail to address important questions implicit in the populist complaint: What is the moral significance of national borders? Do we owe more to our fellow citizens than we owe citizens of other countries? In a global age, should we cultivate national identities or aspire to a a cosmopolitan culture of universal human concern?”Those questions, he allowed, are not easily answered. “They may seem daunting, but the Trumpian moment highlights the need to rejuvenate democratic public discourse. Understanding these grievances and creating a politics that can respond to them is the most pressing political challenge of our time.”When a student asked what Sandel thought was in store for the next four years, he replied that it’s really up to each of us. He warned that protest movements, while admirable, carry unique risks in this era. One risk relates to the frenzied distraction promoted by cable news, which conflates crucial issues with trivial ones. “If you watch cable news, you might think that the Trump travel ban and the Russian involvement in the election are somehow equivalent to a Trump aide flogging Ivanka’s products.”A bigger risk, he said, is that unruly protests can contribute to an overall sense of chaos that suits Trump’s politics. “Tumult and confusion actually strengthen his agenda. We saw this happen with the travel ban. The protests there were laudable and admirable. In previous presidencies, having a policy rollout beset by chaos has weakened the president’s agenda. For Trump, it doesn’t work that way.”last_img read more

Which Broadway Stars Should Release a Holiday Album?

first_img The Broadway.com staff is crazy for Culturalist, the website that lets you choose and create your own top 10 lists. Every week, we’re challenging you with a new Broadway-themed topic to rank.Nothing says “Happy Holidays” like the sound of a Great White Way star belting their face off about sleigh bells, sparkly snow and Santa Claus! Hamilton Tony winner Leslie Odom Jr and Broadway bombshell Megan Hilty both recently released Christmas albums that fans can officially put on blast on November 25. They join the ranks of Judy Garland, Idina Menzel, Kristin Chenoweth, Brian d’Arcy James, Barbra Streisand and many more Great White Way favorites who have already released our go-to tree decorating jams. So which Broadway star should record a holiday album that hasn’t yet? Broadway.com Editorial Assistant Lindsey Sullivan has already got us in the spirit with her top 10. Let us know who’s on your wishlist!STEP 1—SELECT: Visit Culturalist to see all of your options. Highlight your 10 favorites.STEP 2—RANK & PUBLISH: Click “rearrange list” to order your selections. Click the “publish” button.Once your list is published, you can see the overall rankings of everyone on the aggregate list.Pick your favorites, then tune in for the results next week on Broadway.com! View Comments (Photo: Theo Wargo/Getty Images, Bruce Glikas, Caitlin McNaney, Nathan Johnson & Emilio Madrid-Kuser)last_img read more

New Marine Task Force to Use New Platform in Central America

first_imgLt. Col. Soria said the task force, which will send small detachments of Marines to locations throughout Central America, highlights the primary purpose of the JHSV: intra-theater lift. According to current planning, the task force will be active between June and November before redeploying to the United States until the following spring. Its work will augment that of small Marine detachments already in the region, including a civil affairs team in Belize, and security cooperation teams in Honduras, El Salvador, Belize, and Guatemala. It’s good that there is still staff in our country who feel the pain of other people Paxton said the demand for SPMAGTF-South was tied to the successful creation of Marine crisis response task forces for Africa and the Middle East in recent years, joking that “no good deed goes unpunished.” Because of finite resources, he said, the task force would be different and smaller than the other response units, but fine-tuned to the needs of the region. Paxton said the demand for SPMAGTF-South was tied to the successful creation of Marine crisis response task forces for Africa and the Middle East in recent years, joking that “no good deed goes unpunished.” Because of finite resources, he said, the task force would be different and smaller than the other response units, but fine-tuned to the needs of the region. At a Washington, D.C. event in late February, Assistant Commandant Gen. John “Jay” Paxton said the new land-based unit may also make use of new Navy platforms designed to fill gaps in amphibious shipping. Lt. Col. Ignacio Soria, chief plans officer, G-5 for Marine Forces South, confirmed that task force Marines were set to be transported on the JHSV Spearhead, the first in its class. Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-South (SPMAGTF South), a unit comprising about 250 Marines to be headquartered at Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras, will answer a range of needs ranging from partner nation training to humanitarian assistance and counter-drug missions. It’s set to become active in June. “We are committed to tailoring some type of task force, and they are training right now, that would be able to do those missions that Gen. Kelly needs, primarily building partnership capacity … and some counter-narcotics, counter drug mission capability,” Paxton said. “We’re committed to provide that to him.” A new Marine task force set to become active in Central America in time for hurricane season will use a new seabasing platform — the joint high-speed vessel (JHSV) — to transport troops around the region. It’s not the first time Marines will make use of the JHSV in theater. The Spearhead provided transportation to Marines from Camp Lejeune’s 8th Engineer Support Battalion from May to October of last year in support of Southern Partnership Station 2014, according to a March report from the Marine Corps Center for Lessons Learned. The vessel, which divides its time between SOUTHCOM, Europe, and Africa, has also been used by other Marine detachments in the region. “We are committed to tailoring some type of task force, and they are training right now, that would be able to do those missions that Gen. Kelly needs, primarily building partnership capacity … and some counter-narcotics, counter drug mission capability,” Paxton said. “We’re committed to provide that to him.” While plans now call for use of just the Spearhead, another vessel — the Burlington — could also be stationed in the 4th Fleet region sometime prior to fiscal year 2017, pending a final decision, Soria said. Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-South (SPMAGTF South), a unit comprising about 250 Marines to be headquartered at Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras, will answer a range of needs ranging from partner nation training to humanitarian assistance and counter-drug missions. It’s set to become active in June. According to current planning, the task force will be active between June and November before redeploying to the United States until the following spring. Its work will augment that of small Marine detachments already in the region, including a civil affairs team in Belize, and security cooperation teams in Honduras, El Salvador, Belize, and Guatemala. While plans now call for use of just the Spearhead, another vessel — the Burlington — could also be stationed in the 4th Fleet region sometime prior to fiscal year 2017, pending a final decision, Soria said. By Dialogo March 18, 2015 “It is planned right now,” he said. “The only thing that would derail that is if for some reason there was some emergent need that required Fleet Forces Command or Military Sealift Command to divert the mission.” At a Washington, D.C. event in late February, Assistant Commandant Gen. John “Jay” Paxton said the new land-based unit may also make use of new Navy platforms designed to fill gaps in amphibious shipping. “We’re going to work with the Navy to see if there are single ship steamers that are available. We’ll look at alternate platforms … JHSVs and things like that,” Paxton said. “We’re working through not only the demand signal and the mission sets that [U.S. Southern Command Commander Gen. John Kelly] has but their capability and that of the Navy and Marine Corps team.” “It literally lifts the Marines from port to port in the [area],” he said. Lt. Col. Ignacio Soria, chief plans officer, G-5 for Marine Forces South, confirmed that task force Marines were set to be transported on the JHSV Spearhead, the first in its class. “It literally lifts the Marines from port to port in the [area],” he said. Lt. Col. Soria said the task force, which will send small detachments of Marines to locations throughout Central America, highlights the primary purpose of the JHSV: intra-theater lift. SPMAGTF South will also be equipped with four CH-53E Super Stallion Helicopters when activated, said Capt. Armando Daviu, a spokesman for MARFORSOUTH. The Marine units that will send personnel to the task force have not yet been identified, he said, but they are expected to come primarily from II Marine Expeditionary Force, headquartered in North Carolina. A new Marine task force set to become active in Central America in time for hurricane season will use a new seabasing platform — the joint high-speed vessel (JHSV) — to transport troops around the region. SPMAGTF South will also be equipped with four CH-53E Super Stallion Helicopters when activated, said Capt. Armando Daviu, a spokesman for MARFORSOUTH. The Marine units that will send personnel to the task force have not yet been identified, he said, but they are expected to come primarily from II Marine Expeditionary Force, headquartered in North Carolina. “We’re going to work with the Navy to see if there are single ship steamers that are available. We’ll look at alternate platforms … JHSVs and things like that,” Paxton said. “We’re working through not only the demand signal and the mission sets that [U.S. Southern Command Commander Gen. John Kelly] has but their capability and that of the Navy and Marine Corps team.” It’s not the first time Marines will make use of the JHSV in theater. The Spearhead provided transportation to Marines from Camp Lejeune’s 8th Engineer Support Battalion from May to October of last year in support of Southern Partnership Station 2014, according to a March report from the Marine Corps Center for Lessons Learned. The vessel, which divides its time between SOUTHCOM, Europe, and Africa, has also been used by other Marine detachments in the region. “It is planned right now,” he said. “The only thing that would derail that is if for some reason there was some emergent need that required Fleet Forces Command or Military Sealift Command to divert the mission.” last_img read more

As part of First DCA JNC investigationBar panel examines JNC interview process

first_imgAs part of First DCA JNC investigationBar panel examines JNC interview process December 15, 2000 Senior Editor Regular News As part of First DCA JNC investigation Bar panel examines JNC interview process Gary Blankenship Senior Editor A judicial nominating commission panel of inquiry has held a hearing on whether a JNC member had a conflict of interest and brought discredit on the JNC process when she asked a judicial candidate questions about his health and finances. The panel, headed by former 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Chief Judge Joseph Hatchett and including former Florida Bar President John Frost and former Florida Association for Women Lawyers President Ava Doppelt, took about three and a half hours of testimony in Tallahassee on November 29. The case arose after Jacksonville attorney Scott Makar, a candidate for two First DCA vacancies, objected to questions he was asked by JNC member Elizabeth White when the panel conducted interviews on September 18 and 19. He claimed she used one-sided information from his divorce case file, which was refuted by other information in the file that wasn’t presented to the commission. Subsequently, the Jacksonville Justice Coalition filed a complaint, asking for an investigation, and a member of the JNC said the complaint was legally sufficient to proceed. Since White was appointed to the JNC by the Bar, Bar President Herman Russomanno was empowered to appoint the three-member panel of inquiry. Its report will go to Russomanno and the Bar Board of Governors. Hatchett noted the panel is trying to determine two issues. The first is whether White had a conflict of interest because her husband, Jacksonville attorney William Sheppard, had written a letter of support for another candidate, Charles Pillans, in 1998 when he was recommended for a previous DCA vacancy. The second was whether White’s actions brought discredit to the JNC and the nominating process. Panel members asked witnesses what recommendations they would make to help JNCs around the state determine what are proper and improper questions to ask of candidates. Hatchett said he expected the final report to make such recommendations. “If we don’t, I don’t see what good we will have done,” he said. “Someone needs to do it.” “Are there questions or a line of questioning that could be inappropriate?” Doppelt asked Ana Christina Martinez, chair of the First DCA JNC. She replied that commissioners should avoid asking applicants about their stands on political issues. In response to another question, Martinez said she encouraged JNC members to ask tough questions and, unlike some other nominating commissions, has a policy of not considering in its confidential deliberations any issues which have not been raised with applicants. Another member of the JNC, Panama City attorney James Fensom, asked the panel for advice on whether commissioners should ask sensitive questions in a friendly manner or as though they were conducting a cross examination. Asked by panel members what he thought of White’s questioning of Makar, Fensom said he had no problems with the subject matter but added that perhaps the way they were asked was too aggressive. “Personally, I do not see the advantage in a difficult cross examination. . . and being confrontational with a difficult situation,” he said. “I do believe Mr. Makar did feel he was in a difficult situation and that he was taken aback.” About half of the session was devoted to testimony by White, who first answered questions from her attorney, James Russ, and then from the panel. White, who was appointed by the Bar Board of Governors last June, said she was assigned to do preliminary investigations of four of the initial 32 applicants for the two DCA vacancies. Those four did not include Makar, but White said when she called for references, those people invariably asked who other applicants were and then offered comments. In that way, White said, she learned Makar had been through “a nasty divorce.” That prompted her to reexamine his application, which acknowledged the divorce, but she felt he was less than forthright about it. White said that unease led her to send an investigator from her law firm to review Makar’s divorce file, and the investigator copied several pages. She said those records caused her concern because financial affidavits in the file apparently differed from those filed with the commission. White was also concerned with health allegations in the file. Makar did not attend the hearing, instead sending a message that he was ill. He did send another member of his firm’s Tallahassee office with a binder which held a letter he had previously sent to the First DCA JNC. In the letter, he said questions raised by White were answered or refuted in other parts of the court file that were not presented to the JNC, and he presented those records in the binder. But White testified that her reading of the court file left those issues unresolved. Hatchett asked White if she thought there was a conflict because her husband had written a letter to the Governor supporting Pillans for a previous First DCA vacancy. White answered that did not constitute a conflict, under the rules of the JNC. She later added: “I may have known at the time [my husband] wrote that letter of recommendation. I certainly never saw it. I did not recall it until I was advised by a reporter that he had written one.” White also said, and Sheppard agreed in his testimony, that they concluded when she was appointed to the JNC that he would not write any letters. Sheppard backed his wife that she did not have a conflict, and said he had forgotten he wrote the letter for Pillans in 1998 until it was reported in a news story. Testifying on his wife’s behalf, Sheppard told the panel, “She’s her own person. If I had gotten to messing around with what she was doing, I would have gotten in trouble with her. “Ms. White threw herself into this far beyond what anyone could have imagined. That’s her style,” Sheppard continued, adding at one point their dining room table was covered with papers, and that she made dozens of phone calls checking out applicants. Sheppard, who served on the Fourth Circuit JNC, including a year as chair, said they did discuss how to handle sensitive questions. “I told her, `This is a tough job. You’ve got to ask hard questions’.. . . I said `You have a constitutional duty here. You have taken an oath,’” he said. “In my experience, I have asked questions that are far more piercing than the ones Ms. White is accused of asking Mr. Makar.” Aside from White and Sheppard, White’s attorney, James Russ, also called on fellow First DCA JNC member Melvin Stith and Bar Board of Governors member Hank Coxe. In addition, JNC members Fensom and Martinez testified voluntarily. Stith, a nonlawyer member, testified that he thought both White’s questions and the way she asked them were appropriate, and that other applicants were asked tough questions, including ones about financial issues. He also said he wasn’t bothered that Sheppard had previously written a letter for Pillans. Coxe, who represents the Fourth Circuit on the board, recounted how he had asked White to apply for the First DCA JNC vacancy as a backup to another attorney who was being asked to apply. When that attorney was appointed by Gov. Bush to the Fourth Circuit JNC, White became the prime candidate. She was reviewed by a board screening committee and rated highly qualified, Coxe said, and the board approved her appointment last June. Coxe said he recruited White because she “is extremely bright and extremely well respected in the legal community. . . and she knows her own mind.” Coxe, who has also served on the Fourth Circuit JNC, said he didn’t see Sheppard’s letter for Pillans as a conflict, and did not view White’s questions as out of line. He added he’s heard tougher questions asked during his JNC service. Asked about the obligation and responsibility of a JNC in screening a candidate, Coxe answered: “The obligation is to identify and ferret out any information that is related to the qualifications and character of the individual. As far as to whom the obligation is owed, I think it’s owed to the people. The Governor has a right to rely that the names he gets have been thoroughly screened.” Coxe noted in 1996 he joined and became a partner in the law firm where Pillans is also a partner, but when the appointment was made he believed that Pillans would not be reapplying for future vacancies. He also told White and others they might never get to screen candidates, because no First DCA judges were near the mandatory retirement age. But then in August, two judges announced they were retiring, triggering the screening process. Martinez told the panel that the commission had informally discussed the handling of negative information and the asking of tough questions. “What I told them was I encouraged them to ask the difficult questions and that I would not be inclined to give any credibility [to information brought up during confidential deliberation] that wasn’t brought up during the interview process,” Martinez said. “Now that this has happened, would you give the same recommendation?” Hatchett asked. “Yes, I would,” Martinez answered. “It is our job to ask the hard questions.” Martinez, who said Makar is a close personal and professional friend, said the situation was difficult. She said she was looking at adopting a local rule that when a member discovers such negative information, it be reported to the chair who can ask a second commission member to check it out. She noted that Jacksonville attorney A. Wellington Barlow had proposed a procedural rule for all JNCs that required that any negative information be presented to an applicant before it could be raised in confidential deliberations. But the assembled JNCs, meeting at their annual institute several years ago, couldn’t agree on a uniform rule. All JNC uniform rules must be approved by a majority of the JNCs, according to Art. V., Sect. 11(d) of the Florida Constitution. Martinez said Barlow acted after negative information was raised in Fourth Circuit JNC deliberations, and the information had not been presented to the candidate during the screening interview. The information prevented the candidate from being nominated to the Governor, and the JNC subsequently discovered the information was false. Doppelt asked Martinez about Makar’s assertion he should have had advance warning that financial and health questions were going to be asked. Martinez replied that the First DCA JNC has historically not done that, but she was surprised to learn at a recent meeting some JNCs do give advance warning of such questions. Like many procedural and other matters, those are left to the individual commissions, she said.last_img