Canada declares 15 November as National Philanthropy Day

first_imgAndrew Watt, FInstF, president and CEO of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, said: “With the passage of this bill, Canada has taken a leadership role in global philanthropy. This recognition of NPD underscores just how important giving, volunteering and engagement are to Canada, and we hope this moment will encourage more Canadians to get involved”.This year sees another international initiative to promote charitable giving, #GivingTuesday, supported by technology business news site Mashable.www.npdcanada.org AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy  50 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Howard Lake | 6 November 2012 | News Canada declares 15 November as National Philanthropy Day Canada has become the first country in the world formally to recognise 15 November as National Philanthropy Day. A bill to this effect received its third reading in Canada’s House of Commons yesterday, and royal assent is expected to be given in the next few weeks. The Association of Fundraising Professionals has been instrumental in securing government recognition of the day, which was first established in 1986.On 15 November many Canadians celebrate the work of nonprofits, volunteers and donors with a range of events. The country formally celebrated the day in 2009 but the new bill makes the day a permanent fixture in the official calendar. Advertisementlast_img read more

Sarajevo Half- Marathon for Ecological Awareness: around 1300 Participants Running in Sarajevo

first_imgAround 1300 participants which is a record number so far participates in today’s 8th Sarajevo half-marathon, the biggest international sports manifestation in B&H – by Anadolija.This event was organized on occasion of the International Car free day so it contributes the ecological awareness of the participants and the citizens.“This year, around 1300 participants came, which is a record of all editions we organized so far. Novo Nordisk Fun Run race/walk of 4 kilometres gathered over 500 participants while at the start of the Sarajevo Sperbank half-marathon there is around 750 participants.” – pointed out the director of the Association Maraton Sarajevo, Erol Mujanović and added that the number of this event’s participants is increased from year to year.“The number of marathon lovers in B&H is increased, and this year participants from even 30 different countries of the world joined us” – said Mujanović.He emphasized that a great number of citizens is interested in running and healthy living so that a great number of those who do it just for recreation is present too.The paticipants started at Trg djece Sarajeva and the sign to start was given by the Ambassador of Spain in B&H Maria Aurora Mejia Eraskin.According to the organizer’s words, the participants will run for an hour, and pass through almost all parts of Sarajevo during that time.“They will be running through the centre of the city, through Old Town, Vilson’s promenade and at the stadium Koševo.” – said Mujanović and added this route is chosen according to the world standards and is very attractive.When it comes to prizes, the first three places will be awarded financially while all participants of the race will receive t-shirts and medals after the race.“That way, all participants will have a nice souvenir from Sarajevo” – said Mujanović.(Source: Oslobođenje / photo: Anadolija)last_img read more

Students Need to Argue Science, Not Memorize It

first_imgA professor of science education has a radical idea: teach science through argumentation, because that’s the way scientists do it.If you were bored in science class having to learn a bunch of facts, you might have perked up if your teacher taught it the way Jonathan Osborne recommends: argue a position from available evidence.  PhysOrg introduced its article by saying, “Teaching students how to argue based on available evidence engages them in the scientific process and provides a better idea of how science actually works.”Earth orbits the sun. Microorganisms cause infectious disease. Plants use carbon dioxide to grow. Most of us know these scientific truths from our earliest school days. They’re accepted facts. But astronomers, microbiologists and botanists once fought for these concepts using arguments based on evidence. Science, it seems, arrives at its tenets through argument.Science education should follow suit, says Stanford education Professor Jonathan Osborne. Teachers should help students learn to argue a position from available evidence, he says, helping them learn why we know what we know.In short, Osborne wants students to think about evidence, not just be told conclusions.  “In science, people argue for their ideas, in terms of the evidence that they have,” he said. “There should be more opportunities to look at why some ideas are wrong, as well as what the right ideas are.”The concept of “justification” for “right” ideas is lacking in science education, Osborne believes.  His recommendations were published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 50:3, March 2013.  The only hard part is training science teachers to change their ways.The article led to a flurry of argumentation in the comments about what constitutes a legitimate scientific theory.  Osborne was mentioned in our 5/21/2012 entry where he promoted “collaborative discourse” in the science class.Osborne’s ideas are good, but he doesn’t go far enough.  Indoctrination into a consensus is still possible under his model, if the concepts of “evidence” and “justification” are not unpacked.  This is another good time to remind readers of the course on Philosophy of Science offered by The Teaching Company, where you can see how difficult it is to justify even the simplest of scientific truths.  Another worthwhile course (though flawed when it discusses intelligent design) is Science Wars: What Scientists Know and How They Know It.  (Reader tip: these go on sale for 70% off from time to time).It’s not clear from the article if Osborne understands the problems with peer review and consensus.  Does he have a Popperian view of science, or a Kuhnian view?  How about the view of Feyerabend, Cartwright, or van Fraasen? Lakatos or Polanyi?  What is even meant by science these days, when it covers everything from sociology to string theory? Students should learn not just to argue evidence, but to argue philosophy of science.  They can’t study science without knowing what it is.  Yes, normal science includes argumentation, but it can also include social pressure.  Students need to know that scientific institutions, made up of fallible people who don’t know everything, can enforce conformity within popular paradigms, which regulate what questions are important and what is meant by “evidence.”Dead ideologies can be dangerous.  Positivism and scientism still parade through high schools, like zombies, without students realizing they’re dead.  Let them learn to beware the zombie science teachers who say, “Scientists now know….”(Visited 32 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tiger Woods hopeful a 5th Masters leads to more majors

first_imgDuterte wants probe of SEA Games mess “The only thing I can promise you is this, that I will be prepared,” Woods said in his first extensive comments since leaving Augusta National with a fifth green jacket.“Now whether or not it all comes together … because you need to have mind, body and soul come together for those four days. That doesn’t always happen,” Woods said. “If you think about it, I’ve been out here what, 23 years or so? It’s only come together 15 times.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsWoods spoke to Discovery-owned GOLFTV in a 27-minute interview Thursday as part of his endorsement role to provide exclusive content to the global video streaming service.Nicklaus set the gold standard in golf with 18 professional majors. Woods won his 14th major in 2008 in the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines when he was 32, and breaking the record seemed inevitable until a fourth surgery on his left knee, and then four surgeries on his back in a three-year span. View comments Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles He also gave credit to his caddie, Joe LaCava, for persuading him to arrive at Augusta National on the Sunday afternoon before instead of Monday. Woods said he was working so hard on his game that he wasn’t about to play, so instead he took a wedge and a putter for nine holes.“That nine-hole session on Sunday set the tone for my mind being opened up to see the amount of break,” Woods said.Woods said he had been thinking about the Masters for six months. Now he faces a quick turnaround — the PGA Championship starts in three weeks at Bethpage Black, where Woods won the U.S. Open in 2002. He last played it in 2012 during the FedEx Cup playoffs, which is when he first complained of a sore back.He says he will lean on experience of past preparations, such as his three straight majors in 2000 that he won in a span of 66 days.For now, he has done very little. Woods compares this Masters to his first one in 1997 because it took time for the magnitude to sink it.“I haven’t got to the point where I’m willing to put in the hours yet and do the dirty stuff to get the body ready, to put in all the hours of hitting golf balls and putting,” Woods said. “I’m doing all the visual stuff, but I haven’t put in the physical work yet. But it’s probably coming this weekend.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Tiger Woods reacts as he wins the Masters golf tournament Sunday, April 14, 2019, in Augusta, Ga. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)WEST PALM BEACH, Florida— Tiger Woods hopes winning the Masters to end 11 years without a major will be a spark in his renewed pursuit of the record held by Jack Nicklaus.Even so, Woods tells GOLFTV it will take “special moments” like his one-shot victory at Augusta National.ADVERTISEMENT DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid LATEST STORIES “I always thought it was possible, if I had everything go my way,” Woods said in the interview. “It took him an entire career to get to 18, so now that I’ve had another extension to my career — one that I didn’t think I had a couple of years ago — if I do things correctly and everything falls my way, yeah, it’s a possibility.”Woods believes his Masters victory — his first major when he was trailing going into the final round — began last summer when he briefly held the lead Sunday at the British Open, and then pushed Brooks Koepka to the end in a runner-up finish at the PGA Championship.“Those two major championships allowed me to have this one,” Woods said. “And hopefully, this one will allow me to have a few more.”He attributed a big part of his Masters victory to a swing key leading up to the week that allowed him to hit draws with his driver. Woods conceded he no longer has the length that allowed him to hit 3-wood off several tees, which he could hit right-to-left more easily.“I’ve lost a little bit off my fastball, so I’ve got to rely on the driver,” Woods said. “And so I found something in my game when I start feeling comfortable turning it.”ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img ‘Kid was depressed’: Naomi Osaka in first clay quarterfinal after ‘rough months’ SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Private companies step in to help SEA Games hostinglast_img read more

10 months agoChelsea defender Azpilicueta buzzing after Man City win

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea defender Azpilicueta buzzing after Man City winby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea defender Cesar Azpilicueta was delighted with the manner of their victory over Manchester City.The Blues are buzzing after ending City’s unbeaten run.”Every team is different. Every team have different players. We beat City in our own way. Other teams must do it their own way,” said Azpilicueta.”City are so good that you cannot let them dictate the game. After three defeats in two games, people were starting to talk about us (negatively) so to beat City was a big moment for us.”Now people are talking about us beating City but it’s only three points.”Three points against City is the same three points if we beat Brighton on Sunday.”The Spaniard also told the Daily Mail: “Was it my best performance in a Chelsea shirt? I’ve been here for a long time, so it’s hard to say. I’d prefer to focus on the team.” last_img read more

Photo: Ohio State LB Joshua Perry Had To Sit Next To A “Joker” Michigan Fan On His Flight Back From Costa Rica

first_imgOhio State's players walking onto the field.COLUMBUS, OH – NOVEMBER 03: A general view as the Ohio State Buckeyes enters the field before the game against the Wisconsin Badgers on November 3, 2007 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio State defeated Wisconsin 38-17. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)The Ohio State-Michigan rivalry doesn’t just exist domestically. It’s international. Buckeye linebacker Joshua Perry was recently traveling back to the U.S. from Costa Rica. He, unfortunately, came across a Michigan fan at the airport. Then he had to sit in the same row as the Wolverines’ supporter on the plane. It was a friendly encounter, though, it seems. This pic is a gem! We sat next to this joker on the plane back from Costa Rica lol #BucksAbroad #GoBucks! pic.twitter.com/zrLDCOcQnA— Joshua Edward Perry (@RIP_JEP) May 21, [email protected]_JEP Don’t worry though… We gave him a fistful of peel on Block-O tattoos at the airport #PlantingFlags #BucksAbroad— Joshua Edward Perry (@RIP_JEP) May 21, 2015We’re not sure what giving a “fistful of peel on Block-O tattoos” means, but it sounds like Perry won the meeting.last_img read more

Zuckerberg faces Grandpa questions from lawmakers

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election and data privacy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Part of the problem was the structure of the hearings. Dozens of lawmakers had just four or five minutes to ask questions. Tough follow-up queries were few.Another was age: The average age of senators is 62, with several in their 80s. On Tuesday, Senators peppered Zuckerberg with questions about Facebook’s lengthy privacy policy and its data but often didn’t seem to know how to follow up on Zuckerberg’s talk of algorithms and AI systems.Many of Zuckerberg’s answers to Congress people served as a crash course in Facebook 101, or basic information about Facebook’s business model. On Tuesday, 84-year old Senator Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, who had been a senator for nearly eight years when Zuckerberg was born, asked how Facebook’s business model works given that it is free. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg departs after testifying before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election and data privacy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Bobby Rush, D-Ill., appearing frail, reached back in history to liken Facebook’s privacy policy to J. Edgar Hoover’s covert FBI surveillance program, called Counter Intelligence Program, or Cointelpro, in the 1960s. Zuckerberg responded with one of his oft-repeated statements that users control who sees what on their Facebook page.And in the fourth hour of the House hearing on Wednesday, Markwayne Mullin, R.-Okla., asked a question Zuckerberg had been asked multiple times. Once again, it was about the basic way Facebook works.”How can someone control keeping the content within the realm they want it to without being collected?” Mullin asked.”If you don’t want any data to be collected around advertising, you can turn that off and we won’t do it,” Zuckerberg reiterated.The soft questioning “goes directly to the point that the technical expertise among Senators is weak,” said Timothy Carone, Notre Dame business professor.And they allowed Zuckerberg to repeat his talking points—that Facebook doesn’t own or sell users data, that he and other senior executives weren’t proactive enough with Cambridge Analytica but they’ve changed that, and that using artificial intelligence in elections to stop fake accounts is a top priority.The result?”He’s giving the same responses to the same questions from different senators,” said Helio Fred Garcia, a professor of crisis management at NYU and Columbia University in New York. Yet the hearings in Washington managed to showcase the normally press-shy Zuckerberg’s ability to perform as an able and well-rehearsed, if a bit stiff, CEO of one of the world’s biggest companies—and the degree to which much of Congress appears befuddled about technology and the relevant issues.”For the most part, so far, this has been a victory for Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg and enormous validation that D.C. is ineffectual,” said Scott Galloway, who teaches marketing at New York University.The hearings were a major test for Zuckerberg. Facebook is confronting its biggest privacy scandal in 14 years after it was revealed that the data firm Cambridge Analytica misused data from up to 87 million users.Some members of Congress hold computer science degrees or other technical knowledge and were well-versed in the issues, drilling Zuckerberg about how Facebook tracks people who are not on the site and what changes the social media will make to protect user data. Others focused on concerns like censorship and perceived bias on the site as well as children’s privacy policies.But many appeared out of touch on the fundamentals of how Facebook works and lobbed mainly softball questions.On Wednesday Gus Bilirakis, a Florida Republican, asked about the removal of inappropriate opioid advertisements from the site. But he also waxed on about how many people his age and older use Facebook.”My friends, my constituents—we all use Facebook,” Bilirakis said. “It’s wonderful for us seniors to connect with our relatives.” Citation: Zuckerberg faces ‘Grandpa’ questions from lawmakers (2018, April 11) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-zuckerberg-grandpa-lawmakers.html “Senator, we run ads,” Zuckerberg explained, a smile breaking through his solemn demeanor.Another laugh came when Lindsay Graham, R.-S.C., asked whether Facebook was a monopoly.”It certainly doesn’t seem that way to me,” Zuckerberg repliedOn Wednesday, Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, had a similar “Grandpa” moment, holding up his phone and observing that he had received a question from a constituent “through Facebook.””I actually use Facebook,” he added. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pauses while testifying before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election and data privacy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Facebook CEO defends advertising-supported business model Zuckerberg seemed often to retreat to three “safe havens,” Garcia said:One, diffusing responsibility to his “team.”Two, when pressed on policy issues, agreeing to a principle without committing to details.And three, never failing in answering questions to start by addressing the questioner as “Senator” or “Congressman.””He’s diligent in showing deference and respect,” Garcia said.Still, Richard Levick, CEO of public-relations firm Levick, who has worked with executives to prepare for testimony, said that while Zuckerberg performed well, Facebook’s problems don’t end with the end of the hearing.”The real challenge is going to come now,” Levick said. “Everyone will be looking at what Facebook is doing in court and around the country and take issues with the promises that he made today.” Mark Zuckerberg faced two days of grilling before House and Senate committees Tuesday and Wednesday to address Facebook’s privacy issues and the need for more regulation for the social media site. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Explore further © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more